The Good Life

This week and last, I’ve been working on an academic journal devoted to English pedagogy. Half of it is highfalutin theory, and the other half is complaints that border on scorn toward the students. As I listen to my college- and law-school-teaching friends complain about stacks of papers and exams to grade, plagiarists to expose, and heavy courseloads to plan for, I’m reminded again of how good I’ve got it.

My yoga and cycling students want to be in class. They want to do the work. They like it to be challenging–in the case of the indoor cycling students, they complain when it’s too easy. When I look out at my yoga students and see a class full of blank expressions, or when I hear snores in Corpse Pose, I know I’m doing things right. The planning I put into the class is a satisfying use of my teaching training and experience. I have no grading to do.

And when I need some intellectual stimulation, there’s always the other teachers’ complaints to copyedit.

One Response to “The Good Life”

  1. Kika says:

    You definitely have an advantage over people like April and me in that your students want to be in class and want to get everything possible out of it.

    We, however, get a month’s vacation starting now, plus three more months in the summer! 😛

    And I love it when people say to me that they could never work in academia because “too much politics.” I don’t know of any job free of politics.